Photo
thegetty:

This Roman ring is over 1600 years old and still looking as impressive as ever.
Ring, A.D. 375 - 400, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

thegetty:

This Roman ring is over 1600 years old and still looking as impressive as ever.

Ring, A.D. 375 - 400, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

(via ancient-serpent)

Photo
thatlittleegyptologist:

Gallery was quiet today so I wandered about for a bit #egyptology #museumwork

thatlittleegyptologist:

Gallery was quiet today so I wandered about for a bit #egyptology #museumwork

Photoset

historical-nonfiction:

Egyptian blue — a bright blue crystalline substance — is believed to be the first unnatural pigment in human history. Ancient Egyptians used a rare mineral, cuprorivaite, as inspiration for the color. Cuprorivaite was so rare searching and mining for it was impossible. Instead, using advanced chemistry for the time, Egyptians manufactured the color. It was made by mixing calcium compound (typically calcium carbonate), a copper-containing compound (metal filings or malachite), silica sand and soda or potash as a flux, then heating to between 850-950 C.

Egyptian blue was widely used in ancient times as a pigment in painting, such as in wall paintings, tombs and mummies’ coffins, and as a ceramic glaze known as Egyptian faience.  Its use spread throughout Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and the far reaches of the Roman Empire. It was often used as a substitute for lapis lazuli, an extremely expensive and rare mineral sourced in Afghanistan. After the decline of the Roman Empire, though, Egyptian Blue quickly disappeared from use.

(Source : artinsociety.com, via themindislimitless)

Photo
hismarmorealcalm:

"Sheik el Beled" Wooden statue Fifth Dynasty  Cairo Museum  detail

hismarmorealcalm:

"Sheik el Beled" Wooden statue Fifth Dynasty  Cairo Museum  detail

(via isgandar)

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lionofchaeronea:

Two Etruscan dancers.  Fresco from the Tomb of the Triclinium in the Necropolis of Monterozzi, ca. 470 BCE.  Now in the National Etruscan Museum of Tarquinia, Italy.

lionofchaeronea:

Two Etruscan dancers.  Fresco from the Tomb of the Triclinium in the Necropolis of Monterozzi, ca. 470 BCE.  Now in the National Etruscan Museum of Tarquinia, Italy.

(via spectralbird)

Photo
pearl-nautilus:

17th century poison cabinet designed to look like a book

pearl-nautilus:

17th century poison cabinet designed to look like a book

(via mercurialmalcontent)

Photo
dharmagun:

mortem-et-necromantia:

Vintage Exorcism kit.

everyone’s getting one of these for christmas

dharmagun:

mortem-et-necromantia:

Vintage Exorcism kit.

everyone’s getting one of these for christmas

(via jumpingjacktrash)

Text

Anonyme a dit: What can you tell us about the mothers of most pharaohs? Obviously we know about some, especially those that were Great Royal Wife, like Hetepheres or Tiye, but what about those like Mutemwiya who were only secondary wives during their husband's lifetime?

thatlittleegyptologist:

Unsurprisingly, not a lot. As with most historical records, the achievements and lives of men often overshadow those of the women in their lives. A woman would have to be remarkable to be brought to the forefront of the records, and even then a modern historian may choose to discard her worth.
Most secondary wives, and even beyond that, were not thought of as particularly important, and in some ways they weren’t. If they were not mother to the heir to the throne of Egypt, then they were not noted down with any great care. Most secondary wives were known as Hmt nTr (God’s Wife), and if they bore the king a son who would become Pharaoh then they also had the name mwt nTr (God’s Mother). Great Royal wife is not always used in the titulary so distinguishing chief wives is tricky. Beyond this, there is little anyone can say about them, bar names, titles, and various conjecture about lineage, as there is a dearth of information relating to them. This is particularly prominent in the 17th Dynasty where even the fathers of some are in dispute. The secondary wives, if indeed there are any, are often completely unknown. We can barely piece their lives together, and those we can (such as Hetepheres and Tiye) are more widely known. Even Nefertari, being the great love of Ramesses II, does not have a lot of information recorded about her. The same goes for his other wives Istnofret, Bint-Anath, Aerytamun, Nebettawy, Henutmire, Maathomeferure, and the unnamed final Queen (probably Hittite in origin).

Those such as Mutnofret (or Mutneferet if you write out translit differently) wife of Thutmosis I and mother to Thutmosis II, have barely any record to their names at all. She’s at Deir el Bahri, a stele in the Ramesseum, and mentioned on a statue in the Chapel of Wadjmose (another of her son’s by Thutmosis, but who died in infancy). Other than this we know nothing about her. 
Nubemhat is the name of the Great Royal wife of Sobekemsaf I, we only know of her through one statue found in Kawa, Nubia, and a stele at Dendera. The stele also mentions Haanhkes, wife of Sekhemre-Heruhirmaat Intef, whose son Ameni, married Sobekemheb who was the daughter of Nubemhat. But this is the only attestation of her to exist. 
Tem, given the name Queen Consort as one of the wives of Montuhotep II, was also known as Mother of the Dual King meaning that it is highly likely she is Montuhotep III’s mother. But beyond the one mention of her we know nothing more. Montuhotep III is thought to have fathered Montuhotep IV with a harem wife, Imi, but this is still debated, and again this is only one of a couple of mentions of her existing. 
Finally, since this could drag on for a while with me naming lost Royal wives, Neferitatjanen was the wife of Amenemhat I and mother of Senwosret I. We only know of her through a single statue of her son that bears her name, and the title mwt-nsw “King’s Mother”

So, I guess to reiterate the statement at the beginning of this wall of text, is that we know very very little. Even though we want to know more, the record just does not survive beyond a name found here or there to tell us who these women were. 

Photo
ancientpeoples:

Arc Sistrum
664-332 BC
Late Period, Egypt
(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Arc Sistrum

664-332 BC

Late Period, Egypt

(Source: The Metropolitan Museum)

(via spectralbird)

Photo
hismarmorealcalm:

Inner Court and Colonnade  Temple of Horus  Ptolemaic Period  Unknown photographer

hismarmorealcalm:

Inner Court and Colonnade  Temple of Horus  Ptolemaic Period  Unknown photographer

(via isgandar)

Photo

The Wilton Cross
Anglo-Saxon, AD 675-700From Wilton, Norfolk, England
A cross-shaped gold and garnet cloisonné pendant set with an Early Byzantine coin
This pendant displays the reverse of a lightweight solidus of the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius (reigned AD 610-41), which can be dated to between 613 and 630. The coin reverse, with a cross potent (with bars across the ends of the arms) on a stepped base, has been mounted upside down, perhaps so that it appeared the correct way up to the wearer.
The coin is held in a filigree collar and surrounded by a ring of garnet cloisonné. The three flaring arms of the cross each contain a pattern of mushroom-shaped cells separated by arrowhead-shaped cells. This combination may itself be read as a stepped cross. The creation of cryptic motifs within a larger cloisonné pattern was a favourite device of Germanic jewellers from the fifth to the seventh centuries.
The dated coin means that the Wilton Cross could not have been made before AD 613. In fact, the cross can also be dated by comparison with other high-quality Anglo-Saxon jewellery with overall garnet cloisonné. The combination of cell-shapes is paralleled on the Sutton Hoo ornaments and on a cloisonné cross found at Ixworth in Suffolk and now in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. These exceptionally fine pieces of jewellery were probably made in an East Anglian workshop active in the early seventh century AD.
L. Webster and J. Backhouse, The making of England: Anglo-S, exh. cat. (London, The British Museum Press, 1991)
R.L.S. Bruce-Mitford, Aspects of Anglo-Saxon archaeo (London, Gollancz, 1974)
British Museum

The Wilton Cross

Anglo-Saxon, AD 675-700
From Wilton, Norfolk, England

A cross-shaped gold and garnet cloisonné pendant set with an Early Byzantine coin

This pendant displays the reverse of a lightweight solidus of the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius (reigned AD 610-41), which can be dated to between 613 and 630. The coin reverse, with a cross potent (with bars across the ends of the arms) on a stepped base, has been mounted upside down, perhaps so that it appeared the correct way up to the wearer.

The coin is held in a filigree collar and surrounded by a ring of garnet cloisonné. The three flaring arms of the cross each contain a pattern of mushroom-shaped cells separated by arrowhead-shaped cells. This combination may itself be read as a stepped cross. The creation of cryptic motifs within a larger cloisonné pattern was a favourite device of Germanic jewellers from the fifth to the seventh centuries.

The dated coin means that the Wilton Cross could not have been made before AD 613. In fact, the cross can also be dated by comparison with other high-quality Anglo-Saxon jewellery with overall garnet cloisonné. The combination of cell-shapes is paralleled on the Sutton Hoo ornaments and on a cloisonné cross found at Ixworth in Suffolk and now in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. These exceptionally fine pieces of jewellery were probably made in an East Anglian workshop active in the early seventh century AD.

L. Webster and J. Backhouse, The making of England: Anglo-S, exh. cat. (London, The British Museum Press, 1991)

R.L.S. Bruce-Mitford, Aspects of Anglo-Saxon archaeo (London, Gollancz, 1974)

British Museum

Photo
The el-Amarna Hoard
From el-Amarna, Egypt18th Dynasty, 14th century BC
Egypt’s earliest money
These ingots and metal rings date from the fourteenth century BC and were found at el-Amarna. They give us rare archaeological evidence for Egypt’s earliest money system.
Before coins started to circulate in ancient Egypt around 500 BC, there was a system of values based on weights of gold, silver and copper. Metal measured in units of weight known as deben (around 90 g) could be used to settle bills and to trade. Records from the Eighteenth Dynasty (1550-1295 BC) show that often the actual metal did not change hands; instead it was used to value goods for exchange. Egypt had no easily accessible source of silver, but the Egyptian word for silver, hedj, came to mean something close to ‘money’.
The complete ingots from el-Amarna weigh around 3 deben (265-286 g) and the rings seem to be fractions of the deben.
British Museum

The el-Amarna Hoard

From el-Amarna, Egypt
18th Dynasty, 14th century BC

Egypt’s earliest money

These ingots and metal rings date from the fourteenth century BC and were found at el-Amarna. They give us rare archaeological evidence for Egypt’s earliest money system.

Before coins started to circulate in ancient Egypt around 500 BC, there was a system of values based on weights of gold, silver and copper. Metal measured in units of weight known as deben (around 90 g) could be used to settle bills and to trade. Records from the Eighteenth Dynasty (1550-1295 BC) show that often the actual metal did not change hands; instead it was used to value goods for exchange. Egypt had no easily accessible source of silver, but the Egyptian word for silver, hedj, came to mean something close to ‘money’.

The complete ingots from el-Amarna weigh around 3 deben (265-286 g) and the rings seem to be fractions of the deben.

British Museum

Photo
hismarmorealcalm:

Statue of King Thutmose III  New Kingdom - Dynasty XVIII  Egyptian Museum  Photographer  Émile Brugsch

hismarmorealcalm:

Statue of King Thutmose III  New Kingdom - Dynasty XVIII  Egyptian Museum  Photographer  Émile Brugsch

(via isgandar)

Photo
ancient-serpent:

Enamelled gold ring with rubies (Europe, 1550-75), the bezel in the form of a skull and cross-bones in a border of rubies with an enamelled rosette behind. V&A Museum
Photoset

golgothacommunicationsltd:

Hittite cuneiform script.

(via isgandar)

Tags: hittite script