Photo
ancientpeoples:

Relief of Antelopes
Egyptian
ca. 1352-1336 B.C.E.
The scene to which this block once belonged probably showed a desert hunting party. The hunters, Akhenaten and his entourage, would have appeared in chariots bearing down on their helpless prey. Their approach has not gone unnoticed: the ears of the two bubalis antelopes perk up at the sound of danger. The back of a third antelope may be seen in the lower right corner. Such isolated blocks provide a hint of the complex decorative schemes that once existed in the palace at el Amarna.
Source: Brooklyn Museum

ancientpeoples:

Relief of Antelopes

Egyptian

ca. 1352-1336 B.C.E.

The scene to which this block once belonged probably showed a desert hunting party. The hunters, Akhenaten and his entourage, would have appeared in chariots bearing down on their helpless prey. Their approach has not gone unnoticed: the ears of the two bubalis antelopes perk up at the sound of danger. The back of a third antelope may be seen in the lower right corner. Such isolated blocks provide a hint of the complex decorative schemes that once existed in the palace at el Amarna.

Source: Brooklyn Museum

Photo
archaicwonder:

Roman Gold and Heliotrope Magic Chnoubis Pendant, Circa 3rd-4th Century AD
Chnoubis is an Egyptian Gnostic solar icon, found most often on gnostic gems, and amulets for protection against poison and disease. It is a composite figure with the head of a lion and the body of a serpent, usually with seven rays emanating from the head. 
The lion’s head represents the solar forces and enlightenment; the serpent, the lower impulses and earth. The rays represent the seven planets, the seven Greek vowels (which were an important part of ritual magic) and the seven colors of the visible spectrum.
The Chnoubis was seen as a very powerful creature which was used for protection when other things would not seem to work. He was easily conjured and put to work with a loyal disposition towards his owners and guarded all members of the family.
Here the heliotrope stone is engraved with the image of Chnoubis with his name inscribed in Greek, XNOVBIC dispersed between the rays emanating from his head. There is a crescent and star to the left enclosed in an inscription:  IAWCABAWTHABPACASMIXAHLEW.This inscription is a series of magical names including Sabaoth, Abrasax and the archangel Michael, followed by the phrase “I am.” The back of the stone has a two-line inscription, OVPIHL COVPIHL, for the two archangels Uriel and Suriel, framed by stars.

archaicwonder:

Roman Gold and Heliotrope Magic Chnoubis Pendant, Circa 3rd-4th Century AD

Chnoubis is an Egyptian Gnostic solar icon, found most often on gnostic gems, and amulets for protection against poison and disease. It is a composite figure with the head of a lion and the body of a serpent, usually with seven rays emanating from the head. 

The lion’s head represents the solar forces and enlightenment; the serpent, the lower impulses and earth. The rays represent the seven planets, the seven Greek vowels (which were an important part of ritual magic) and the seven colors of the visible spectrum.

The Chnoubis was seen as a very powerful creature which was used for protection when other things would not seem to work. He was easily conjured and put to work with a loyal disposition towards his owners and guarded all members of the family.

Here the heliotrope stone is engraved with the image of Chnoubis with his name inscribed in Greek, XNOVBIC dispersed between the rays emanating from his head. There is a crescent and star to the left enclosed in an inscription:  IAWCABAWTHABPACASMIXAHLEW.

This inscription is a series of magical names including Sabaoth, Abrasax and the archangel Michael, followed by the phrase “I am.”

The back of the stone has a two-line inscription, OVPIHL COVPIHL, for the two archangels Uriel and Suriel, framed by stars.

(via ancient-serpent)

Photo
brassmanticore:

Openwork pear-shaped gold pendant, set with pearls in rows of small and larger settings.
16th-17th century, from the Cheapside Hoard.
(Similar to this one at the British Museum.  I forget where I found this image).

brassmanticore:

Openwork pear-shaped gold pendant, set with pearls in rows of small and larger settings.

16th-17th century, from the Cheapside Hoard.

(Similar to this one at the British Museum.  I forget where I found this image).

Text

Ancient Puppy Paw Prints Found on Roman Tiles

archaeologicalnews:

image

The paw prints and hoof prints of a few meddlesome animals have been preserved for posterity on ancient Roman tiles recently discovered by archeologists in England.

"They are beautiful finds, as they represent a snapshot, a single moment in history," said Nick Daffern, a senior project manager with Wardell Armstrong Archaeology. "It is lovely to imagine some irate person chasing a dog or some other animal away from their freshly made tiles."

The artifacts, which could be nearly 2,000 years old, were found in the Blackfriars area of Leicester, the English city where the long-lost bones of King Richard III were discovered under a parking lot in 2012. Read more.

Photoset

richard-miles-archaeologist:

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two 

Episode 6 “City of Man, City of God”

Palmyra, an important ancient city located in an oasis northeast of Damascus, was made part of the Roman province of Syria during the reign of Tiberius. 

Outside the ancient walls, in the desert, the Palmyrenes constructed a series of large-scale funerary monuments which now form the so-called Valley of the Tombs, with a series of large, richly decorated structures. Some tombs were below ground. Human busts in high relief represented the “personality” or “soul” of the person interred and formed part of the wall decoration inside the tomb chamber.

Palmyra, Syria

(via spectralbird)

Tags: palmyra syria
Photo
wolfhalden:

Mummy Portrait of a Girl - Roman Egypt 120-150 AD; Wax colors (encaustic) on sycamore wood.
Mumienbildnis eines Mädchens, römisches Ägypten 120–150 n. Chr.; Wachsfarben (Enkaustik) auf Sykomorenholz.
Source/Quelle: liebieghaus.de

wolfhalden:

Mummy Portrait of a Girl - Roman Egypt 120-150 AD; Wax colors (encaustic) on sycamore wood.

Mumienbildnis eines Mädchens, römisches Ägypten 120–150 n. Chr.; Wachsfarben (Enkaustik) auf Sykomorenholz.

Source/Quelle: liebieghaus.de

(via spectralbird)

Photoset

ancientart:

Frog Effigy Pendant from northwestern Colombia. Dates from AD 900.

Courtesy & currently located at the Walters Art Museum, via their online collections. Accession number: 2009.20.78.

Link

brassmanticore:

A joint international research team led by the University of Oxford, in collaboration with the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities (SCTA), has discovered a giant tusk in the Arabian Desert.

The two pieces of tusk, which together measure six feet (2.25m) in length, are thought to have belonged to a now extinct genus known as Palaeoloxodon (the so-called ‘straight-tusked’ elephants).

An elephant’s carpal bone located five metres away from the pieces of tusk was also recovered from the same sand layer at an excavation site in the Nefud Desert. The sand layer was dated to around 325,000 years before the present day in recently published work by a Swiss team (Rosenberg et al in 2013), and the Oxford team says this suggests that the elephant remains found there are also about that age.

The research team also discovered other animal remains in the same sand layer, including a big cat, thought to be a now-extinct jaguar, and the remains of a member of the horse family, as well as oryx – antelope species which are still native to the Arabian Peninsula today.

Project leader Professor Mike Petraglia, from the School of Archaeology at the University of Oxford, said: ‘The discovery of the elephant tusk is significant in demonstrating just how much the climate could have changed in the Arabian Desert. Elephants would need huge quantities of roots, grasses, fruit and bark to survive and they would have consumed plenty of water too.

'Although the sand dunes in the Nefud Desert carry on for miles in the present day, indeed across an area the size of England, around 325,000 years ago it seems the landscape would have been very different.'

The findings were revealed at the Green Arabia conference at Oxford University, at which scientists are examining the latest evidence on how early humans and animals are likely to have been affected by past climate change in the Arabian Peninsula.

Photo
ancientpeoples:

Mummy of an Ibis bird 
Wrapped in linen and showing the figure of Duamutef. Duamutef is one of the four sons of Horus. These four sons are often depicted on canopic jars as the protectors of the organs after they have been removed from the body. 
Found in Memphite region, Saqqara (20km south of Cairo)
Egyptian, Late Period / Roman Period, 400 BC - 100 AD. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum 

ancientpeoples:

Mummy of an Ibis bird 

Wrapped in linen and showing the figure of Duamutef. Duamutef is one of the four sons of Horus. These four sons are often depicted on canopic jars as the protectors of the organs after they have been removed from the body. 

Found in Memphite region, Saqqara (20km south of Cairo)

Egyptian, Late Period / Roman Period, 400 BC - 100 AD. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum 

Photo
femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
Painted in 1872 by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, about whom I’ve written once before, this heartbreaking scene is called Death of the Pharaoh’s Firstborn Son.
Set in front of the biblical pharaoh and his son are alabaster containers, probably of some (unsuccessful) medicine, even smaller stoppered vessels by the side perhaps contributing the ingredients; and a somewhat ambiguous heap of fabric, flowers, and religious tokens lie to the side.
It may be that his “paintings offer no moral lessons,” as the Getty comments, but the depth of emotion in this Pietà-like piece is stunning nonetheless.
The stoic sorrow of the Pharaoh himself; the highly ceremonial deference of those to the bottom right, perhaps nervous of his reaction to his son’s death; the overwhelming grief of the mother; even the slightly uncomfortable, silent solemnity of the man to the left; there is something stunningly timeless in the feeling of even this very historical painting.

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

Painted in 1872 by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, about whom I’ve written once before, this heartbreaking scene is called Death of the Pharaoh’s Firstborn Son.

Set in front of the biblical pharaoh and his son are alabaster containers, probably of some (unsuccessful) medicine, even smaller stoppered vessels by the side perhaps contributing the ingredients; and a somewhat ambiguous heap of fabric, flowers, and religious tokens lie to the side.

It may be that his “paintings offer no moral lessons,” as the Getty comments, but the depth of emotion in this Pietà-like piece is stunning nonetheless.

The stoic sorrow of the Pharaoh himself; the highly ceremonial deference of those to the bottom right, perhaps nervous of his reaction to his son’s death; the overwhelming grief of the mother; even the slightly uncomfortable, silent solemnity of the man to the left; there is something stunningly timeless in the feeling of even this very historical painting.

(via muerte-arabe)

Text

This World is not Conclusion

This World is not Conclusion.
A Species stands beyond—
Invisible, as Music—
But positive, as Sound—
It beckons, and it baffles—
Philosophy—don’t know—
And through a Riddle, at the last—
Sagacity, must go—
To guess it, puzzles scholars—
To gain it, Men have borne
Contempt of Generations
And Crucifixion, shown—
Faith slips—and laughs, and rallies—
Blushes, if any see—
Plucks at a twig of Evidence—
And asks a Vane, the way—
Much Gesture, from the Pulpit—
Strong Hallelujahs roll—
Narcotics cannot still the Tooth
That nibbles at the soul—
Photo
in-the-horniman:

Recently we reviewed a few objects from our archaeology collection, included this beautiful glass jar from Palestine.

in-the-horniman:

Recently we reviewed a few objects from our archaeology collection, included this beautiful glass jar from Palestine.

Photoset

themagpie:

Howard Carter’s drawings from KV 62, Tutankhamun’s tomb.

(Source : griffith.ox.ac.uk, via archaeo-geek)

Text

Ancient Art from Mesopotamia!

medievalpoc:

eastiseverywhere submitted:

I’m submitting something that I originally featured on my own blog, East Is Everywhere . (It was part of my Africa week!)

http://eastiseverywhere.tumblr.com/post/78658887700/nubian-with-oryx-monkey-and-leopard-skins-iraq

Nubian with oryx, monkey, and leopard skinsIraq, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu).  Excavated at Fort Shalmaneser. (800-700 BCE, Neo-Assyrian period)Ivory carvingMetropolitan Museum of ArtFrom here Africa and West Asia have had contact for a frickin’ long time, yo’. Btw, Nubia is in present-day Sudan. This Nubian tribute bearer exhibits traits of the Phoenician style, characterized by the slender, elongated form of the bearer and his animal gifts, the precision of carving and intricacy of detail, and the distinct Egyptian flavor of both pose and features.

Nubian with oryx, monkey, and leopard skins
Iraq, Nimrud (ancient Kalhu).  Excavated at Fort Shalmaneser. (800-700 BCE, Neo-Assyrian period)
Ivory carving
Metropolitan Museum of Art
From here

Africa and West Asia have had contact for a frickin’ long time, yo’. Btw, Nubia is in present-day Sudan.

This Nubian tribute bearer exhibits traits of the Phoenician style, characterized by the slender, elongated form of the bearer and his animal gifts, the precision of carving and intricacy of detail, and the distinct Egyptian flavor of both pose and features.

Photo
medievalpoc:

Ancient Art Week!
Egyptian Scarab Amulets with Faces of Black Men
Egypt (c. 6th Century B.C.E.)
Oxford, Ashmolean Museum.

Far from mere curiosities, the black-head scarabs in fact form an important link in the transmission of the image of black people between Egypt and the nascent world of classical Greece. In the late archaic period of Greek history, when the Naukratis heads were made, fuller historical and artistic evidence offers useful insight into the process of transmission of the image of black people to other lands and cultures.

Read the Full Article at TheRoot

medievalpoc:

Ancient Art Week!

Egyptian Scarab Amulets with Faces of Black Men

Egypt (c. 6th Century B.C.E.)

Oxford, Ashmolean Museum.

Far from mere curiosities, the black-head scarabs in fact form an important link in the transmission of the image of black people between Egypt and the nascent world of classical Greece. In the late archaic period of Greek history, when the Naukratis heads were made, fuller historical and artistic evidence offers useful insight into the process of transmission of the image of black people to other lands and cultures.

Read the Full Article at TheRoot